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African Americans

 Subject
Subject Source: Library Of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 321 Collections and/or Records:

Series 18: The Davis Center Oral History Project, 2019

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc018
Scope and Contents The focus of this oral history project is, Ms. Beatrice Davis-Williams, who impacted her neighborhood, the arts, and D.C. positively for over 50 years through her community-focused center, The Davis Center. Since 1969, the Davis Center has provided dance instruction and arts-related education to Washington D.C. residents of all ages and diverse backgrounds. Narrators include Davis Center students, parents, community members and others whose lives have been influenced and enriched by Ms....
Dates: 2019

Series 20: Marshall Heights: Civic Mindedness and Engagement Incarnate, pre-DC Home Rule Oral History Interview, 2020

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc020
Scope and Contents This project tells the story of life in Marshall Heights by interviewing member of the neighborhood who shaped the community, as well as reflecting on other neighbors that were active in the development of the neighborhood. The Marshall Heights neighborhood became home to many heroic Black veterans returning from World War II, as well as Black masons and carpenters, who, through their hard work and ingenuity, carved out new paths for economic development for its residents. The Marshall...
Dates: 2020

Series 22: Flowers and Families: The Stories of the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, 2019

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc022
Scope and Contents Friends of Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens initiated this oral history project to share the park’s history and its modern story. The project attempted to answer questions such as: What does the park mean to Ward 7 residents? What memories do Ward 7 residents have of it? How has it changed in the last few decades? How does it relate to a larger discussion of the significance of green spaces? The answers to these questions were meant to add to the established narrative of the park’s creation to...
Dates: 2019

Series 25: Voices of The D.C. Fort Totten Storytellers, 2019

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc025
Abstract

Voices of The D.C. Fort Totten Storytellers interviews Black residents who lived in Fort Totten in the 1950s, when families began to enjoy the equal opportunity of purchasing homes in the community developed by Morris Cafritz.

Dates: 2019

Series 26: From Pandemic to Protest: Black Bartenders in Washington, D.C., 2020

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc026
Abstract

From Pandemic to Protest: Black Bartenders in Washington, D.C. documents the experiences of bartenders in the Shaw neighborhood during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Narrators discuss the close-knit Black bartending community in D.C.; the impact of the Black Lives Matter and MeToo movements on the hospitality industry; the gentrification of the Shaw neighborhood; and the history of Black bartending.

Dates: 2020

Series 28: Over the River and Through the Woods, Longtime Residents and Parklands of Ward 8, 2020

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc028
Abstract

The forests in Ward 8 lack many of the features we expect of public parks and are sometimes seen as impassible. However, many older residents speak of how they once explored the woods, or of catching crayfish. Some even trapped small mammals. Some built fortresses or played tag among creaking tree trunks. This project collected the memories of Ward 8's people, its wild spaces and hiking trails.

Dates: 2020

Series 29: The Washington Section, National Council of Negro Women Monument or Movement: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, 2020

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc029
Abstract This project explores the impact of programs and activities The Washington Section, National Council of Negro Women past presidents, members and other key people. The interviews were meant to form the basis of an assessment of the organization’s importance from its founding in 1943 to the present and a guide for the future. The stories collected speak to how the Washington Section established and maintained a strong presence through its involvement with women, children and their families in...
Dates: 2020

Series 30: Transgender Histories of D.C., 2021

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc030
Abstract This project seeks to answer the question: how have the changes in D.C. over the past several decades been experienced and influenced by transgender individuals and communities? Individuals who are transgender, marginalized by society at large, have a unique perspective on history, at the same time as they are left out of mainstream accounts of events. This project documents the events of the final decades of the 20th century and first few of the 21st through the eyes of transgender elders,...
Dates: 2021

Series 34: Asbury United Methodist Church Oral History Project, 2021

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc034
Scope and Contents From the Collection:

D.C. Oral History Collaborative (DCOHC) is a citywide initiative to train community members in oral history skills, fund new and ongoing oral history projects, connect volunteers with oral history projects, and publicize existing oral history collections. DCOHC is a project of DC Public Library, HumanitiesDC, and the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. This collection contains oral history interviews, transcripts, and indexes produced by DCOHC grantees.

Dates: 2021

Series 41: Asbury United Methodist Church Oral History Project, 2022

 Series
Identifier: dcpl_dcohc041
Abstract

Asbury United Methodist Church Oral History Project features interviews from members of Asbury United Methodist Church in Washington, D.C. These episodes are drawn from oral histories of members of one of Washington’s historic Black churches. Asbury has been at the corner of 11th and K Streets Northwest since its founding in 1836. These church members share their personal experiences with Black history, national history and the history of the Washington, D.C., area.

Dates: 2022